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Seminars and Workshops

Seminars and Workshops

CILT works with UCT educators to develop capacity to teach effectively in varied environments. We host, design, develop and run workshops, seminars, and Show and Tell meetings. Members of our team become involved in design and teaching partnerships with UCT educators who want to put their learning from the workshops and seminars into practice. We are also interested in forming research partnerships with UCT educators who want to research their teaching practices.

Past seminars video recording links and details can be found here

 

Workshop & Seminar List For 2016​:

Please note that we have decided to cancel all workshops and seminars scheduled for the rest of the year. However, if you, or a group of your colleagues, would like to arrange a workshop or a meeting with us at CILT you are welcome to email us at this address cilt.events@uct.ac.za

Past Workshops 2016:

*Please note that this workshop has been cancelled*

23 Nov - Introduction to Vula: Basic Training

The Vula Support Team from the Centre for Innovation in Learning and Teaching (CILT) provides training in the form of 2.5hr hands-on mini-workshops. Training is geared toward providing an introduction to Vula, which includes a comprehensive overview of what Vula can be used for and also addressing immediate training requirements. Groups are limited to a maximum of 18.

Who should attend?
UCT administrative and support staff who require basic skills and knowledge to be able to use Vula for course and/or research administration purposes.

At the end of this course you should be able to, among other things:

  • Manage your own Vula account
  • Create and configure a course/project Vula site
  • Manage a course/project Vula site (including adding/removing members and tools)
  • Manage groups and sections (i.e. tutorial  groups) within your Vula site
  • Enable the distribution of content and communication from your Vula site

Training Date: Wed 23 Nov (10:00-12:30)
Venue: Teaching Lab 1, Upper Campus Student Learning Centre, Level 4, Steve Biko Building

*Please note that this workshop has been cancelled*

21 Nov - Blended learning with Vula: review and revise

Blended courses have a component/s of the course that is online. Many courses at UCT utilise Vula as the online space. This two part workshop will help you to make even more effective use of Vula in your teaching and learning context. It provides an opportunity to review the role of your Vula site in your course and to explore achievable options for redesigning the ways that you use Vula tools in teaching. Each part of the workshop will last 2 hours with a week in between the lab meetings.
 
Meeting 1:You will analyse your own site using a conceptual framework based on the seven Principles of good teaching. By the end of Part One you will have decided on several available ways to enhance your site.

Meeting 2: We will examine the strengths and weaknesses that emerged and explore ways to introduce new Vula tools or use and/or adapt other exciting technology tools from the Web. Members of CILT will work with you during the workshop on these additions and/ or improvements and will continue to support you as needed after the workshop.

Attendance options for session 1:
Mon 21 Nov (14:00-16:00)
Wed 23 Nov (10:00-12:00)
Fri 25 Nov (14:00-16:00)

Attendance options for session 2:
Mon 28 Nov (14:00-16:00)
Wed 30 Nov (10:00-12:00)
Fri 02 Dec (14:00-16:00)

Venue: Teaching Lab 1, Upper Campus Student Learning Centre, Level 4, Steve Biko Building

*Please note that this workshop has been cancelled*

9 Nov - An introduction to Lessons - a Vula tool for structuring your course (online)

The Lessons tool (formerly called Lesson Builder) allows one to organize resources, quizzes, assignments, forums, and media (e.g. videos, audios and images) in a central location so that students don’t need to navigate to different tools to get things done. Lessons allows you to structure your course in a modular format that could guide your students through their learning tasks. It creates structured pages that pull content and functionality from other tools and organizes them as a series of sequential tasks.  In the current version one can also require that students meet a certain criteria before proceeding to the next section.This workshop will expose the various options in the Lessons tool and provide participants with a hands on experience of using this tool.

Date: Wed 9 Nov (10:00 - 13:00)
Venue: Teaching Lab 1, Upper Campus Student Learning Centre, Level 4, Steve Biko Building

*Please note that this workshop has been cancelled*

8 Nov - Integrating digital literacies into the curriculum

In order for students to meaningfully engage in technology-enhanced 'educational practices' and 'workplace situated practices', they need to be digitally literate. Digital literacies for students involve using digital tools; engaging in information literacy practices such as finding, evaluating, creating and effectively sharing information; and soundly engaging in online spaces that students encounter in learning contexts and beyond. This implies that, to better prepare students for such environments, digital literacies need to be integrated into course curricula.
 
Bearing in mind that disciplines may embrace different digital literacies, the purpose of this session is to: 1) share some ideas, 2) showcase some case studies and 3) work with some frameworks that academics could possibly use for integrating digital literacies into the curriculum of their respective courses.

Attendance options:
Tue 08 Nov (10:00-13:00)
Thu 10 Nov (10:00-13:00)

Venue: Teaching Lab 1, Upper Campus Student Learning Centre, Level 4, Steve Biko Building

*Please note that this workshop has been cancelled*

31 Oct - Enhancing lectures through the use of learning design principles

Workshop details to be announced.

Attendance options for session 1:
Mon 31 Oct (14:00-16:00)
Wed 02 Nov (10:00-12:00)
Fri 04 Nov (14:00-16:00)

Attendance options for session 2:
Mon 14 Nov (14:00-16:00)
Wed 16 Nov (10:00-12:00)

Venue: Teaching Lab 1, Upper Campus Student Learning Centre, Level 4, Steve Biko Building

*Please note that this workshop has been cancelled*

30 Sep - Presentation skills and Techniques

This workshop speaks to the design approaches towards using PowerPoint in a classroom setting. We will focus on how using this tool add value to your lecture and have it act as a focussing point for student attention rather than a cruel and unusual form of punishment. We’ll look at how PowerPoint can be abused and provide design hints to help avoid these pitfalls. We’ll also show the explicit links between effective teaching design of a lecture and the utilisation of PowerPoint.

Please note: This is not a workshop on how to use the bells and whistles tools in PowerPoint. We will only be using a basic set of tools as the focus will be on effective teaching design.

*Please note that this workshop has been cancelled*

*Please note that this workshop was postponed. We have not yet chosen a new date on which to hold the event.*

16 Sep - Peer assessment with Digital Tools

While peer assessment offers opportunities to enhance student learning, reduce staff workload and offer timeous and formative feedback, it can be a challenging strategy to incorporate into higher education classrooms. This workshop identifies contexts in which peer assessment might usefully be adopted, suggests principles for introducing peer assessment in a higher education context, followed by two or three peer assessment cases focusing on key peer assessment tools and processes, and an opportunity for participants to design a peer assessment process for a course they are teaching on.

Date:
Fri 16 Sep (14:00-16:00)
Please note that the Wed 14 Sep session is no longer available as an option.

Venue: Teaching Lab 1, Upper Campus Student Learning Centre, Level 4, Steve Biko Building

31 Aug - Using the Vula Test & Quizzes Tool

In this workshop, Roger Brown from the Vula team will explore the functionality of the Assignment and Test & Quiz tools. This workshop will be run along the lines of a Q&A workshop with participants proving the topics to be explored or discussed.

Vula's Test and Quiz (T&Q) tool enables you to set MCQs, fill-in-the-blank, numeric response, short answer, true/false or matching type questions. T&Q allows negative marking, generates question statistic and simplifies item analysis. In addition, automatic marking can be used to populate the Vula Gradebook.

Date: Wed 31 Aug (10:00-13:00)
Venue: Teaching Lab 1, Upper Campus Student Learning Centre, Level 4, Steve Biko Building

24 Aug - Introduction to Vula: Basic Training

The Vula Support Team from the Centre for Innovation in Learning and Teaching (CILT) provides training in the form of 2.5hr hands-on mini-workshops. Training is geared toward providing an introduction to Vula, which includes a comprehensive overview of what Vula can be used for and also addressing immediate training requirements. Groups are limited to a maximum of 18.

Who should attend?
UCT administrative and support staff who require basic skills and knowledge to be able to use Vula for course and/or research administration purposes.

At the end of this course you should be able to, among other things:

  • Manage your own Vula account
  • Create and configure a course/project Vula site
  • Manage a course/project Vula site (including adding/removing members and tools)
  • Manage groups and sections (i.e. tutorial  groups) within your Vula site
  • Enable the distribution of content and communication from your Vula site

Training Date: Wed 24 Aug (10:00-12:30)
Venue: Teaching Lab 1, Upper Campus Student Learning Centre, Level 4, Steve Biko Building

15 Aug - Teaching with Visuals

This two part workshop will explore how to use images and other visualisations creatively as a lecturer. Copyright issues and options will also be discussed. We will explore the use of Infographics as well as creating your own infographics using Wordle and other tools. Lastly we will explore the latest trends and uses of Visuals in Higher Education. This workshop will be co-presented by Rondine Carstens, Thomas King and Ian Schroeder from the Centre for Innovation in Learning and Teaching.

Session 1: We will discuss the pedagogy of teaching with visualisations. Copyright and Creative Commons relating to visualisations will be explored as well as where to source images online. The nature of effective imagery will also be explored.

Session 2:  There will be an opportunity to practice what you have learnt, by creating an infographic. You will be shown how to edit photos, add filters, resize images and animate your visuals. Lastly, we will have an overview on “What’s hot and Trending”.

Attendance options for session 1:
Mon 15 Aug(14:00 - 16:00)
Fri 19 Aug (14:00 - 16:00)

Attendance options for session 2:
Mon 22Aug (14:00 - 16:00)
Please note that the Fri 26 Aug session is no longer available.

Venue for session 1: CILT Blue Room, Level 7, PD Hahn Building, Upper Campus
Venue for session 2: Teaching Lab 1, Upper Campus Student Learning Centre, Level 4, Steve Biko Building

17 Aug - Using Sketchnotes as a tool for Teaching and Learning

An interactive, creative workshop on a great alternative for taking notes: Sketchnotes!

Sketchnotes are visual maps that are built from a mix of doodles, typography, shapes and other visual elements. This visual and holistic approach to note taking engages your mind so you can understand complex ideas you’re hearing while activating your hand to turn those ideas into concrete visual notes.

Date: Wed 17 Aug (14:00-16:00)
Venue: To be announced

12 Aug - Preparing an abstract for #TLC2016

The annual UCT Teaching and Learning Conference will be held on 20 October 2016. This year’s conference is themed “At the edge”, and challenges presenters to frame their presentations to highlight the innovative or boundary-pushing elements of their work.
 
The deadline for abstract submissions is 17 August 2016. If you are interested in learning more about what to expect from #TLC2016, please watch the video on YouTube.
 
If you would like support with writing your abstract or some feedback on an existing abstract, then this workshop is definitely for you!  During the workshop, we will

  • expand our understanding of the TLC audience,
  • refine our focus for this conference,
  • draft our abstract, and
  • consider how this activity might have a life beyond #TLC2016

In addition to supporting the writing of a focused abstract, this session will help you design your presentation for conference.
 
BYOD -  Bring your own device!

Date: Fri, 12 August 2016 (14:00 – 15:30)
Venue: Green Meeting Room, CILT, Level 7, P D Hahn Building, Upper Campus

Sign up here

12 Aug - Integrating digital literacies into the curriculum

**Please note that the Friday 12th session is cancelled**

In order for students to meaningfully engage in technology-mediated 'educational practices' and subsequently participate in 'workplace digital practices', they need to be digitally literate. Digital literacies for students involve using digital (generic and discipline specific) tools; engaging in information literacy practices such as evaluating, creating and effectively sharing information; and soundly collaborating and engaging in online spaces. This suggests that, to better prepare students for digitally-mediated environments, digital literacies need to be taught through integrating them into course curricula.
 
Bearing in mind that disciplines may embrace different digital literacies, the purpose of this session is to: 1) share some ideas, 2) showcase some case studies and 3) work with some frameworks that academics could possibly use for integrating digital literacies into the curriculum of their respective courses.
 
On the 10th: We have an Information Systems lecturer showcasing how she has used the Digital and Information Literacy Framework to integrate digital literacies into a first year Information systems course.
 
On the 12th: We have a Humanities lecturer showcasing how she has used Zaption, an interactive video tool, for teaching academic literacies in a first year Humanities course.

Attendance options:
Wed 10 Aug (10:00-13:00)
Fri 12 Aug (10:00-13:00) - CANCELLED

Venue: Teaching Lab 1, Upper Campus Student Learning Centre, Level 4, Steve Biko Building

11 Jul - An introduction to Lessons - a Vula tool for structuring your course (online)

The Lessons tool (formerly called Lesson Builder) allows one to organize resources, quizzes, assignments, forums, and media (e.g. videos, audios and images) in a central location so that students don’t need to navigate to different tools to get things done. Lessons allows you to structure your course in a modular format that could guide your students through their learning tasks. It creates structured pages that pull content and functionality from other tools and organizes them as a series of sequential tasks.  In the current version one can also require that students meet a certain criteria before proceeding to the next section.This workshop will expose the various options in the Lessons tool and provide participants with a hands on experience of using this tool.

Date: Mon 11 Jul (10:00 - 13:00)
Venue: Teaching Lab 1, Upper Campus Student Learning Centre, Level 4, Steve Biko Building

8 Jul - Using Sketchnotes as a tool for Teaching and Learning

An interactive, creative workshop on a great alternative for taking notes: Sketchnotes!

Sketchnotes are visual maps that are built from a mix of doodles, typography, shapes and other visual elements. This visual and holistic approach to note taking engages your mind so you can understand complex ideas you’re hearing while activating your hand to turn those ideas into concrete visual notes.

Date: Fri 8 July (13:00-15:00)
Venue: CILT Green Room (7.63), Level 7, PD Hahn Building, Upper Campus

08 Jun - Blended learning with Vula: review and revise

Blended courses have a component/s of the course that is online. Many courses at UCT utilise Vula as the online space. This two part workshop will help you to make even more effective use of Vula in your teaching and learning context. It provides an opportunity to review the role of your Vula site in your course and to explore achievable options for redesigning the ways that you use Vula tools in teaching. Each part of the workshop will last 2 hours with a week in between the lab meetings.
 
Meeting 1:You will analyse your own site using a conceptual framework based on the seven Principles of good teaching. By the end of Part One you will have decided on several available ways to enhance your site.

Meeting 2: We will examine the strengths and weaknesses that emerged and explore ways to introduce new Vula tools or use and/or adapt other exciting technology tools from the Web. Members of CILT will work with you during the workshop on these additions and/ or improvements and will continue to support you as needed after the workshop.

Attendance options for session 1: 
Wed 08 Jun (10:00-12:00)
Fri 10 Jun (14:00-16:00)

Attendance options for session 2:
Mon 13 Jun (14:00-16:00)
Wed 15 Jun (10:00-12:00)

Venue: Teaching Lab 1, Upper Campus Student Learning Centre, Level 4, Steve Biko Building

e-Assessment Seminar and Workshop 31 May and 2 June

This two-part offering will focus on the contemporary affordances and challenges of assessing students and student work in the online learning environment.

The first part (Tuesday 31 May from 13h00 - 14h00 in the Green Room, PD Hahn Building) will focus on the overarching issues that are and should be of interest to us all:

  • The higher education environment and the need for e-learning policy
  • The extent to which policy can support and provide the enabling conditions for e-learning and e-assessment
  • Policy and the regulatory environment
  • The extent to which policy supports or interacts with contemporary online teaching and learning issues, such as the ‘unbundling’ of higher education teaching and learning and the offerings of private higher education online learning providers

The second part of the offering (Thursday 2 June from 11h00 - 13h00 in 3A, Hoerikwaggo Building) will focus on e-assessment practices and address the following questions:

  • ‘Doing assessment’ online - is it a case of transferring face-to-face assessment to an online environment?
  • The affordances and challenges of online assessment - a continuum from formative to summative assessment?
  • Online assessment practices - issues of purpose; format; grading; feedback; teaching and learning

Associate Professors Laura Czerniewicz and Alan Cliff will facilitate the seminar and workshop. Laura will enable the broad policy discussion and Alan will locate the practices discussion in the context of the policy.

Participants are encouraged to attend both sessions. However, the sessions will function as stand alone offerings to allow for people with specific interests to attend one or the other.

18 May - Knowledge Building and Visualisation using Concept Mapping for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education

Concept maps have been shown to be a form of visualisation that has significant value for building, presenting and assessing knowledge. This workshop will attempt to answer the following questions and provide hands on experience where applicable.

  • How are mind maps and concept maps different?
  • How and why can we use concept maps for teaching and learning?
  • How can we develop digital and online concept maps?

This workshop will be presented by Shanali Govender from the Centre for Innovation in Learning and Teaching (CILT).

Attendance options for session 1:
Wed 18 May (10:00-12:00)
Fri 20 May (14:00-16:00) - Repeat of Wed session

Attendance options for session 2:
Wed 25 May (10:00-12:00)
Fri 27 May(14:00-16:00) - Repeat of Wed session

Venue:
Teaching Lab 1, Upper Campus Student Learning Centre, Level 4, Steve Biko Building (above the book shop)

04 May - Introduction to Vula: Basic Training

The Vula Support Team from the Centre for Innovation in Learning and Teaching (CILT) provides training in the form of 2.5hr hands-on mini-workshops. Training is geared toward providing an introduction to Vula, which includes a comprehensive overview of what Vula can be used for and also addressing immediate training requirements. Groups are limited to a maximum of 18.

Who should attend?
UCT administrative and support staff who require basic skills and knowledge to be able to use Vula for course and/or research administration purposes.

At the end of this course you should be able to, among other things:

  • Manage your own Vula account
  • Create and configure a course/project Vula site
  • Manage a course/project Vula site (including adding/removing members and tools)
  • Manage groups and sections (i.e. tutorial  groups) within your Vula site
  • Enable the distribution of content and communication from your Vula site

Training Date: Wed 04 May (10:00-12:30)
Venue: Teaching Lab 1, Upper Campus Student Learning Centre, Level 4, Steve Biko Building

25 Apr - Using the Vula Evaluation/Survey Tool

This workshop will explore how to use Vula’s Evaluation tools in terms of in class surveys, course evaluations, polls etc. Participants will we taken through the process of setting up their questions, define the poll or evaluation and accessing the results.

Date:  Mon 25 Apr (10:00-13:00)
Venue: Teaching Lab 1, Upper Campus Student Learning Centre, Level 4, Steve Biko Building

13 Apr - Designing a Course Evaluation

The design of course evaluations that matter: this workshop will focus on design issues around the development of course evaluations that enable the collection of meaningful information. Some of the topics that will be addressed will be: the meanings and purposes of course evaluations; alignments between design and purpose; the development of effective evaluation instrumentation; analysis and interpretation of data obtained from evaluation.

Date: Wed 13 Apr (10:00-12:00)
Venue: Green Meeting Room (CILT 7.63), Level 7, PD Hahn Building, Upper Campus

16 Mar - A Basic Introduction to Vula for Teaching and Learning

This workshop will provide UCT staff involved in teaching with a basic introduction to Vula, the learning management system at UCT. This workshop assumes that participants have little or no experience with Vula. We will explore the possibilities of using Vula for various online aspects of a typical course as well as a hands on introduction to some of the basic features in Vula. This will allow participants to start developing and using their own online course sites at UCT. We will also showcase and discuss how selected UCT lecturers have used Vula to enhance their teaching and the learning experience of the students.

Date: Wed 16 Mar (9:30 - 12:00)
Venue: Teaching Lab 1, Upper Campus Student Learning Centre, Level 4, Steve Biko Building

14 Mar - Using Sketchnotes as a Tool for Teaching and Learning

Sketchnotes are rich visual notes created from a mix of handwriting, drawings, hand-drawn typography, shapes, and visual elements like arrows, boxes and lines. Sketchnotes are visual maps that are built from meaningful thoughts and ideas your mind collects and runs away with during lectures, talks, panels, experiences and meetings. This visual and holistic approach to note taking engages your mind so you can understand the ideas you’re hearing while activating your hand to turn those ideas into concrete visual notes. 

Attendance options:
Mon 14 Mar (14:00 - 16:00)
Fri 18 Mar (14:00 - 16:00)

Venue: Green Meeting Room (CILT 7.63), Level 7, PD Hahn Building, Upper Campus

02 Mar - Exploring the Higher Education landscape

The workshop Exploring the Higher Education landscape will run next week. This workshop can form part of the Supporting Emerging Academics’ Teaching programme.  Read more about the programme here.

Who should attend?
 
This workshop is aimed at tutors, postgraduate students, technical, professional and part-time staff who teach in a variety of formal or informal spaces. Although this workshop will allow an opportunity to begin to think critically about your practice, the primary focus will be on practical aspects of preparing to support students’ learning.
 
Details:

This two hour workshop introduces us to key ideas in understanding the higher education landscape.  

Part 1: We will explore a range of documentation from various sources pertaining to higher education in South Africa, and attempt to identify the particular challenges and opportunities experienced in the global, regional and local contexts. By the end of this workshop, participants should be able to identify and describe key features of the higher education landscape, and articulate their position in relation to these.

Part 2: This workshop focuses us at the level of faculty, department, and course. We explore some of the tools available to us to help build a more nuanced and evidence-based picture of the contexts in which we teach.

This workshop will be presented by Shanali Govender from the Centre for Innovation in Learning and Teaching (CILT).

Attendance options for Part 1:
2 March (3-5PM)
4 March (3-5PM) repeat of 2 March session

Attendance options for Part 2:
16 March (3-5PM)
18 March (3-5PM) repeat of 16 March session

Venue: Green Room (7.63), Level 7, PD Hahn Building, Upper Campus

24 Feb - Teaching with Visuals

This two part workshop will explore how to use images and other visualisations creatively as a lecturer. Copyright issues and options will also be discussed. We will explore the use of Infographics as well as creating your own infographics using Wordle and other tools. Lastly we will explore the latest trends and uses of Visuals in Higher Education. This workshop will be co-presented by Rondine Carstens, Thomas King and Ian Schroeder from the Centre for Innovation in Learning and Teaching.

Session 1: We will discuss the pedagogy of teaching with visualisations. Copyright and Creative Commons relating to visualisations will be explored as well as where to source images online. The nature of effective imagery will also be explored.

Session 2:  There will be an opportunity to practice what you have learnt, by creating an infographic. You will be shown how to edit photos, add filters, resize images and animate your visuals. Lastly, we will have an overview on “What’s hot and Trending”.

Attendance options for session 1:
Wed 24 Feb (10:00 - 12:00) **FULL**Please note that this Wed session is now full.
Fri 26 Feb (14:00 - 16:00)

Attendance options for session 2:
Mon 07 Mar (14:00 - 16:00)
Wed 09 Mar (10:00 - 12:00)
Fri 11 Mar (14:00 - 16:00)

Venue:Teaching Lab 1, Upper Campus Student Learning Centre, Level 4, Steve Biko Building

***PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS WORKSHOP IS FULL***

02 Mar - Introduction to Vula: Basic Training

The Vula Support Team from the Centre for Innovation in Learning and Teaching (CILT) provides training in the form of 2.5hr hands-on mini-workshops. Training is geared toward providing an introduction to Vula, which includes a comprehensive overview of what Vula can be used for and also addressing immediate training requirements. Groups are limited to a maximum of 18.

Who should attend?
UCT administrative and support staff who require basic skills and knowledge to be able to use Vula for course and/or research administration purposes.

At the end of this course you should be able to, among other things:

  • Manage your own Vula account
  • Create and configure a course/project Vula site
  • Manage a course/project Vula site (including adding/removing members and tools)
  • Manage groups and sections (i.e. tutorial  groups) within your Vula site
  • Enable the distribution of content and communication from your Vula site

Training Date: Wed 02 Mar (10:00-12:30)
Venue: Teaching Lab 1, Upper Campus Student Learning Centre, Level 4, Steve Biko Building

To sign up please send an email to help@vula.uct.ac.za

02 Mar - Integrating digital literacies into the curriculum

In order for students to meaningfully engage in technology-enhanced 'educational practices' and 'workplace situated practices', they need to be digitally literate. Digital literacies for students involve using digital tools; engaging in information literacy practices such as finding, evaluating, creating and effectively sharing information; and soundly engaging in online spaces that students encounter in learning contexts and beyond. This implies that, to better prepare students for such environments, digital literacies need to be integrated into course curricula.
 
Bearing in mind that disciplines may embrace different digital literacies, the purpose of this session is to: 1) share some ideas, 2) showcase some case studies and 3) work with some frameworks that academics could possibly use for integrating digital literacies into the curriculum of their respective courses.

Date: Wed 02 Mar (10:00-12:00)
Venue: Teaching Lab 1, Upper Campus Student Learning Centre, Level 4, Steve Biko Building

10 Feb - Increasing Participation & Engagement in Lectures: Virtual Classroom Response Systems and Backchannels

  • Do your students (not just a handful) actively participate in class?
  • Did your students “get” the section you have just explained?
  • How easily and quickly do you (as the lecturer) and your students get feedback on their understanding?

Virtual response systems can be used during a lecture to improve student participation & engagement but also to provide feedback for both the lecturer AND the student. These systems allows a lecturer to rapidly collect and display responses from students in a lecture. This workshop will explore the use of virtual response systems as an active learning approach that can be integrated into the design of the student learning experience to increase participation & engagement. In addition, this workshop provides participants with a hands on introduction to virtual clicker systems. If you have a web enabled mobile device please feel free to bring it along for the hands on component (please ensure that it is set up for web access!).

This workshop will be led by Ian Schroeder from the Centre for Innovation in Learning and Teaching (CILT). For those interested, there are possibilities of arranging departmental workshops.

Date: Wed 10 Feb (10:00-13:00)
Venue: Teaching Lab 1, Upper Campus Student Learning Centre, Level 4, Steve Biko Building

08 Feb - An introduction to Lessons - a Vula tool for structuring your course (online)

The Lessons tool (formerly called Lesson Builder) allows one to organize resources, quizzes, assignments, forums, and media (e.g. videos, audios and images) in a central location so that students don’t need to navigate to different tools to get things done. Lessons allows you to structure your course in a modular format that could guide your students through their learning tasks. It creates structured pages that pull content and functionality from other tools and organizes them as a series of sequential tasks.  In the current version one can also require that students meet a certain criteria before proceeding to the next section.This workshop will expose the various options in the Lessons tool and provide participants with a hands on experience of using this tool.

Date: Mon 08 Feb (10:00 - 13:00)
Venue: Teaching Lab 1, Upper Campus Student Learning Centre, Level 4, Steve Biko Building

***PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS WORKSHOP IS FULL***

3 Feb - A Very Brief Introduction to Teaching

Who should attend?

This workshop is aimed at tutors, postgraduate students, technical, professional and part-time staff who teach in a variety of formal or informal spaces. Although this workshop will allow an opportunity to begin to think critically about your practice, the primary focus will be on practical aspects of preparing to support students’ learning.

Details:

This two-part workshop will expose participants to some of the key debates in the field of higher education and learning today.

Part 1 offers an opportunity for individuals to reflect on their own practice and context in order to identify key opportunities for growth and development in relation to improving their teaching practice. It focuses on orientating ourselves in the landscape and examining our fundamental understandings about learning, students, teaching and knowledge in order to better understand our practices. Participants should leave with a clearer sense of the landscape of higher education theory and their own orientation to it.
 
Part 2 offers an opportunity for individuals to revisit their practice in relation to the contextual issues addressed in the previous session. We look very practically at ways of structuring learning experiences and attempt to apply these to our own contexts. Participants should leave with a clear understanding of some of the processes that can be used to design learning experiences, including assessment and evaluation.

This workshop will be facilitated by Shanali Govender(CILT).

Attendance options for session 1:
Wed 03 Feb (14:00 - 17:00)
Fri 05 Feb (14:00 - 17:00)

Attendance options for session 2:
Wed 10 Feb (14:00 - 17:00)
Fri 12 Feb (14:00 - 17:00)

Venue: CILT Blue Meeting Room (7.52), Level 7, PD Hahn Building, Upper Campus

***PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS WORKSHOP IS FULL***

01 Feb - A Basic Introduction to Vula for Teaching and Learning

This workshop will provide UCT staff involved in teaching with a basic introduction to Vula, the learning management system at UCT. This workshop assumes that participants have little or no experience with Vula. We will explore the possibilities of using Vula for various online aspects of a typical course as well as a hands on introduction to some of the basic features in Vula. This will allow participants to start developing and using their own online course sites at UCT. We will also showcase and discuss how selected UCT lecturers have used Vula to enhance their teaching and the learning experience of the students.

Date: Mon 01 Feb (10:00 - 13:00)
Venue: Teaching Lab 1, Upper Campus Student Learning Centre, Level 4, Steve Biko Building

***PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS WORKSHOP IS FULL***

This workshop will run again on the 16th of March (Sign up). Alternatively contact Ian Schroeder to enquire about doing the workshop.

 

Past Workshops 2015

 

 

26 Nov 2015 - An introduction to Lessons - a Vula tool for structuring your course (online)

The Lessons tool (formerly called Lesson Builder) allows one to organize resources, quizzes, assignments, forums, and media (e.g. videos, audios and images) in a central location so that students don’t need to navigate to different tools to get things done. Lessons allows you to structure your course in a modular format that could guide your students through their learning tasks. It creates structured pages that pull content and functionality from other tools and organizes them as a series of sequential tasks.  In the current version one can also require that students meet a certain criteria before proceeding to the next section.This workshop will expose the various options in the Lessons tool and provide participants with a hands on experience of using this tool. This workshop will be led by Lubabalo Badi from the Centre for Innovation in Learning and Teaching.

Date: Thu 26 Nov (10:00 - 13:00)
Venue: Teaching Lab 1, Upper Campus Student Learning Centre, Level 4, Steve Biko Building

 

24 Nov 2015 - Introduction to Vula: Basic Training

The Vula Support Team from the Centre for Innovation in Learning and Teaching (CILT) provides training in the form of 2.5hr hands-on mini-workshops. Training is geared toward providing an introduction to Vula, which includes a comprehensive overview of what Vula can be used for and also addressing immediate training requirements. Groups are limited to a maximum of 18.

Who should attend?
UCT administrative and support staff who require basic skills and knowledge to be able to use Vula for course and/or research administration purposes.

At the end of this course you should be able to, among other things:

  • Manage your own Vula account
  • Create and configure a course/project Vula site
  • Manage a course/project Vula site (including adding/removing members and tools)
  • Manage groups and sections (i.e. tutorial  groups) within your Vula site
  • Enable the distribution of content and communication from your Vula site

Training Date: Tues, 24 Nov (10:00-13:00)
Venue: Teaching Lab 1, Upper Campus Student Learning Centre, Level 4, Steve Biko Building

To sign up please send an email to help@vula.uct.ac.za

 

24 Nov 2015 - A Basic Introduction to Vula for Teaching and Learning

This workshop will provide UCT staff involved in teaching with a basic introduction to Vula, the learning management system at UCT. This workshop assumes that participants have little or no experience with Vula. We will explore the possibilities of using Vula for various online aspects of a typical course as well as a hands on introduction to some of the basic features in Vula. This will allow participants to start developing and using their own online course sites at UCT. We will also showcase and discuss how selected UCT lecturers have used Vula to enhance their teaching and the learning experience of the students.

Date: Tues 24 Nov (10:00 - 13:00)
Venue: Teaching Lab 1, Upper Campus Student Learning Centre, Level 4, Steve Biko Building

 

If you would like more information on the topic you are welcome to contact the workshop presenter Tabisa Mayisela.

11 Nov 2015 - Digital Literacies

In order for students to meaningfully engage in technology-enhanced 'educational practices' and 'workplace situated practices', they need to be digitally literate. Digital literacies involve finding, evaluating, creating and effectively sharing information; and using digital tools and information in learning contexts and beyond. This implies that, to better prepare students for such environments, digital literacies need to be integrated into course curricula.

Bearing in mind that disciplines may embrace different digital literacies, the purpose of this session is to: 1) share some ideas, 2) showcase some case studies and 3) work with some frameworks that academics could possibly use for integrating digital literacies into the curriculum of their respective courses.

Attendance options: Wed 11 Nov (10:00-12:00)

Venue: Teaching Lab 1, Upper Campus Student Learning Centre, Level 4, Steve Biko Building (above the bookshop)

 

12 Oct 2015 - Knowledge Building and Visualisation using Concept Mapping for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education

Concept maps have been shown to be a form of visualisation that has significant value for building, presenting and assessing knowledge. This workshop will attempt to answer the following questions and provide hands on experience where applicable.

  • How are mind maps and concept maps different?
  • How and why can we use concept maps for teaching and learning?
  • How can we develop digital and online concept maps?

This workshop will be presented by Ian Schroeder from the Centre for Innovation in Learning and Teaching (CILT).

Attendance options for session 1:
Mon 12 Oct (THIS SESSION HAS BEEN CANCELLED)
Wed 14 Oct (10:00-12:00) - Repeat of Mon session

Attendance options for session 2:
Wed 28 Oct (10:00-12:00)
Fri 30 Oct (14:00-16:00) - Repeat of Wed session

Venue:
Teaching Lab 1, Upper Campus Student Learning Centre, Level 4, Steve Biko Building (above the book shop)

 

28 Sep 2015 - Using PowerPoint Effectively for Teaching and Learning

This workshop speaks to the design approaches towards using PowerPoint in a classroom setting. We will focus on how using this tool adds value to your lecture and have it act as a focussing point for student attention rather than a cruel and unusual form of punishment. We’ll look at how PowerPoint can be abused and provide design hints to help avoid these pitfalls. We’ll also show the explicit links between the effective teaching design of a lecture and the utilisation of PowerPoint.

Please note: This is not a workshop on how to use the bells and whistles tools in PowerPoint. We will only be using a basic set of tools as the focus will be on effective design.

Attendance options:
Mon 28 Sep (14:00-16:00)
Wed 30 Sep (10:00-12:00) Repeat of Monday session

Venue:
Teaching Lab 1, Upper Campus Student Learning Centre, Level 4, Steve Biko Building

 

9 Sep 2015 - Using Sketchnotes as a tool for Teaching and Learning

Sketchnotes are rich visual notes created from a mix of handwriting, drawings, hand-drawn typography, shapes, and visual elements like arrows, boxes and lines. Sketchnotes are visual maps that are built from meaningful thoughts and ideas your mind collects and runs away with during lectures, talks, panels, experiences and meetings. This visual and holistic approach to note taking engages your mind so you can understand the ideas you’re hearing while activating your hand to turn those ideas into concrete visual notes. 

Attendance options:
Wed 9 Sep (10:00-12:00)
Fri 11 Sep (14:00-16:00) - Repeat of Wed session

Venue: Green Meeting Room (CILT 7.63), Level 7, PD Hahn Building, Upper Campus

 

4 Sep 2015 - Using the Vula Evaluation/Survey Tool 

This workshop will explore how to use Vula’s Evaluation tools in terms of in class surveys, course evaluations, polls etc. Participants will we taken through the process of setting up their questions, define the poll or evaluation and accessing the results.

Date:  Fri 4 Sep 10:00-13:00

Venue: Teaching Lab 1, Upper Campus Student Learning Centre, Level 4, Steve Biko Building (above the bookshop)

 

3 Sep 2015 - Using the Vula Test & Quizzes Tool 

In this workshop, Roger Brown from the Vula team will explore the functionality of the Assignment and Test & Quiz tools. This workshop will be run along the lines of a Q&A workshop with participants proving the topics to be explored or discussed.

Vula's Test and Quiz (T&Q) tool enables you to set MCQs, fill-in-the-blank, numeric response, short answer, true/false or matching type questions. T&Q allows negative marking, generates question statistic and simplifies item analysis. In addition, automatic marking can be used to populate the Vula Gradebook.

Date: 3 Sep, 13:30-16:00

Venue: Teaching Lab 1, Upper Campus Student Learning Centre, Level 4, Steve Biko Building (above the bookshop)

 

26 Aug 2015 - Course Evaluation Design

The design of course evaluations that matter: this workshop will focus on design issues around the development of course evaluations that enable the collection of meaningful information. Some of the topics that will be addressed will be: the meanings and purposes of course evaluations; alignments between design and purpose; the development of effective evaluation instrumentation; analysis and interpretation of data obtained from evaluation.

Date: Wed 26 Aug (10:00-12:00)

Venue: Teaching Lab 1, Upper Campus Student Learning Centre, Level 4, Steve Biko Building (above the bookshop)

 

19 Aug 2015 - Teaching & Learning with Google Sheets and Forms

In this workshop participants will explore ideas around teaching and learning using Google Sheets and Forms.  Participants will have a hands on opportunity to setup and use Doctopus and Goobric in a Google Spreadsheet. These allow for the automatic creating of shared documents between the lecturer and students as well as feedback and marking via a rubric. Participants will also learn how to create quick surveys, simple virtual classroom response system as well as quick, in class, word clouds (for discussion) using Google Forms.

Ideally, participants should have had some experience with Google Drive or Google Documents.   
 
Attendance options:
Wed 19 August (10:00-12:00) - Please note that the Monday 17th August session is no longer available.

Venue : Teaching Lab 1, Upper Campus Student Learning Centre, Level 4, Steve Biko Building (above the bookshop)

 

Due to high demand we plan to run another workshop soon. If you think you would be interested in attending please email Ian Shroeder.

12 Aug 2015 - Designing marking rubrics: balancing between the highly specific and the rather generic

This session will focus on the marking of student work, in particular the tricky issue of assessment criteria – how we define and measure ‘excellence’ (or lack thereof). We will also look at the benefits and possible drawbacks of designing rubrics and the use of rubric for different kinds of assessment (such as written; oral; online). Please bring along any example of a marking/grading scheme/rubric used by you/your department. This workshop is presented by Alan Cliff from the Centre for Innovation in Learning and Teaching.
 
Related to the workshop above is the Teaching & Learning with Google Spreadsheets and Forms workshop where we will walk participants through the process of setting up and using Doctopus and Goobric in a Google Spreadsheet. These allow for the automatic creating of shared documents between the lecturer and students as well as providing feedback in the shared document via a rubric.

Date: Wed 12 August (10:00-12:00)

Venue: Teaching Lab 1, Upper Campus Student Learning Centre, Level 4, Steve Biko Building (above the bookshop)

 

5 Aug 2015 - A Basic Introduction to Teaching and Learning in the Cloud using Google Documents

Cloud computing refers to storing, editing and sharing files on the internet. These files are accessible via computers, laptops or mobile devices which connect to the internet. These cloud based services can provide the building blocks for enhanced engagement between lecturers, students and researchers.  These cloud based tools allow for extended engagements around shared lab reports, essays etc. allowing for rich formative feedback by lecturers, tutors, peers or experts.
 
This is an introductory workshop aimed at those who have not used Google Drive before. This workshop will briefly explore the ideas around technology supported collaboration followed by a basic introduction to Google Drive with a strong focus on using Google Documents to enhance teaching and learning. This workshop is presented by Ian Schroeder from the Centre for Innovation in Learning and Teaching.

Date 1: 
Wed 5 Aug (10:00-12:00)

Venue:
Teaching Lab 1, Upper Campus Student Learning Centre, Level 4, Steve Biko Building

 

22 July 2015 - Increasing Participation & Engagement in Lectures: Virtual Classroom Response Systems and Backchannels

Do your students (not just a handful) actively participate in class?
Did your students “get” the section you have just explained?
How easily and quickly do you (as the lecturer) and your students get feedback on their understanding?

Virtual response systems and backchannels can be used during a lecture to improve student participation & engagement but also to provide feedback for both the lecturer and the student. These systems allows a lecturer to rapidly collect and display responses from students in a lecture. This workshop will explore the use of virtual response systems and backchannels as an active learning approach that can be integrated into a lecture as a means of increasing student participation & engagement. In addition, this workshop provides participants with a hands on introduction to virtual clicker systems as well as a backchannel. If you have a web enabled mobile device please feel free to bring it along for the hands on component (please ensure that it is set up for web access!).  
This workshop will be led by Ian Schroeder from the Centre for Innovation in Learning and Teaching (CILT).

Date: 22 July  (10:00-13:00)

Venue: Teaching Lab 1, Upper Campus Student Learning Centre, Level 4, Steve Biko Building

 

16 July 2015 - A Basic Introduction to Vula for Teaching and Learning

This workshop will provide UCT staff involved in teaching with a basic introduction to Vula, the learning management system at UCT. This workshop assumes that participants have little or no experience with Vula. We will explore the possibilities of using Vula for various online aspects of a typical course as well as a hands on introduction to some of the basic features in Vula. This will allow participants to start developing and using their own online course sites at UCT. We will also showcase and discuss how selected UCT lecturers have used Vula to enhance their teaching and the learning experience of the students.

This workshop will be led by Ian Schroeder and Sam Lee Pan from the Centre for Innovation in Learning and Teaching (CILT)

Date: Thu 16 July (10:00 - 13:00)

Venue: Teaching Lab 1, Upper Campus Student Learning Centre, Level 4, Steve Biko Building

 

8 July 2015 - Blended learning with Vula: review and revise

Blended courses have a component/s of the course that is online. Many courses at UCT utilise Vula as the online space. This two part workshop will help you to make even more effective use of Vula in your teaching and learning context. It provides an opportunity to review the role of your Vula site in your course and to explore achievable options for redesigning the ways that you use Vula tools in teaching. Each part of the workshop will last 2 hours with a week in between the lab meetings.
 
Meeting 1:You will analyse your own site using a conceptual framework based on the seven Principles of good teaching. By the end of Part One you will have decided on several available ways to enhance your site.

Meeting 2: We will examine the strengths and weaknesses that emerged and explore ways to introduce new Vula tools or use and/or adapt other exciting technology tools from the Web. Members of CILT will work with you during the workshop on these additions and/ or improvements and will continue to support you as needed after the workshop.

Attendance options for session 1: 
Wed 8 July (10:00-12:00)

Attendance options for session 2:
Wed 15 July (10:00-12:00) or
Fri 17 July (10:00-12:00)

Venue:
Teaching Lab 1, Upper Campus Student Learning Centre, Level 4, Steve Biko Building

 

8 June 2015 - Digital Scholar Workshop: Enhancing your Online Presence & Professional Learning Networks for Teaching, Learning and Research

This workshop has been postponed.

An alternative option will be available shortly. If you are interested in developing your online presence and personal learning network please contact Ian Schroeder ian.schroeder@uct.ac.za for more details.

What is your digital footprint? Are you aware of your digital shadow? Trying to stay current in your areas of research? Busy finding and collecting the needle in the connected haystack?
 
These questions are very much a product of the connected world in which we live. In this workshop, you will critically explore your current online presence and learning networks. You will also have the opportunity to further develop your online presence and optimise your Professional Learning Network by learning about the tools (Twitter, Tweetdeck, PaperPile, Google Scholar, ImpactStory and others) and developing the techniques necessary to thrive (not just survive!) in the modern connected world.

 

18 June 2015 - “Change the story, change the world”: Using digital storytelling to share stories about teaching and learning in a higher education context

Higher education practitioners and postgraduate students are invited to create digital stories that showcase the diverse experience of UCT classrooms. Telling and documenting these personal-professional stories about our classrooms strengthens our teaching voices and our awareness of the stories of others.
 
The workshop process includes participation in a story circle to craft a script, an introduction to creative visual techniques and the use of video editing software to integrate images and audio. Participants should leave with a complete 3-5 minute digital story which they can upload or link to for their website or digital teaching portfolio.
 
We will be accepting a maximum of 12 participants for this workshop – so book quickly. 
 
Dates and times: 
18 & 23 & 25 June 09:00 – 12:30 (NOTE: You attend on all 3 days)

 

11 May 2015 - Using PowerPoint Effectively for Teaching and Learning

This workshop speaks to the design approaches towards using PowerPoint in a classroom setting. We will focus on how using this tool add value to your lecture and have it act as a focussing point for student attention rather than a cruel and unusual form of punishment. We’ll look at how PowerPoint can be abused and provide design hints to help avoid these pitfalls. We’ll also show the explicit links between effective teaching design of a lecture and the utilisation of PowerPoint.

Please note: This is not a workshop on how to use the bells and whistles tools in PowerPoint. We will only be using a basic set of tools as the focus will be on effective design.

Attendance options:
Mon 11 May (2-4PM) POSTPONED TO MON 18 MAY
Wed 13 May (10AM-12PM) POSTPONED TO WED 20 MAY
Fri 15 May (2-4PM)

Venue:
Teaching Lab 1, Upper Campus Student Learning Centre, Level 4, Steve Biko Building

 

20 April 2015 - Teaching with Visuals

This two part workshop will explore how to use images and other visualisations creatively as a lecturer. Copyright issues and options will also be discussed. We will explore the use of Infographics as well as creating your own infographics using Wordle and other tools. Lastly we will explore the latest trends and uses of Visuals in Higher Education. This workshop will be co-presented by Rondine Carstens, Thomas King and Ian Schroeder from the Centre for Innovation in Learning and Teaching.

Session 1: We will discuss the pedagogy of teaching with visualisations. Copyright and Creative Commons relating to visualisations will be explored as well as where to source images online. The nature of effective imagery will also be explored.

Session 2:  There will be an opportunity to practice what you have learnt, by creating an infographic. You will be shown how to edit photos, add filters, resize images and animate your visuals. Lastly, we will have an overview on “What’s hot and Trending”.

Attendance options for session 1:
Mon 20 April (2-4PM)
Wed 22 April (10AM-12PM)
Fri 24 April (2-4PM) - CANCELLED

Attendance options for session 2:
Mon 4 May (2-4PM)
Wed 6 May (10AM-12PM)
Fri 8 May (2-4PM) - CANCELLED

Venue:
Teaching Lab 1, Upper Campus Student Learning Centre, Level 4, Steve Biko Building

 

Mon 13 Apr 2015 - Using Sketchnotes as a tool for Teaching and Learning

Sketchnotes are rich visual notes created from a mix of handwriting, drawings, hand-drawn typography, shapes, and visual elements like arrows, boxes and lines. Sketchnotes are visual maps that are built from meaningful thoughts and ideas your mind collects and runs away with during talks, panels, experiences and meetings. This visual and holistic approach to note taking engages your mind so you can understand the ideas you’re hearing while activating your hand to turn those ideas into concrete visual notes. Because your mind and body act together, you can recall more of what you hear and draw. Sketchnotes are created in real time while listening to a lecture, presentation, talk or panel discussion. To sketchnote, you listen closely to meaningful ideas, consider what they mean, and then create a visual map of them. The goal is to skip the details and instead listen for big ideas that resonate, converting those ideas into visual notes that include both words and pictures. Whether you create sketchnotes with pen and paper or digitally, the approach is the same.

This workshop will help you discover your creative side, help you practice active listening skills and help you eliminate distractions while sketchnoting. You will learn how to use visual elements to add interest to your sketchnotes, how to use basic elements to express metaphors and what the different ways are of sharing your sketchnotes online.

Attendance options:

Wed 15 April (10AM-12PM) - CANCELLED
Fri 17 April (2-4PM)

Venue: CILT Conference Rm (7.63), Level 7, PD Hahn Building

 

Fri 10 Apr​ 2015 - Using the Vula Gradebook

In this workshop, Roger Brown from the Vula team, will explore the functionality of Vula’s Gradebook. This workshop will be run along the lines of a Q&A workshop.
 
The gradebook is a complicated tool - in this workshop we will learn how:

  • the gradebook can be used to store marks

  • apply weighting and categories to marks

  • import marks directly from the Test and Quizzes tool and the Assignment tool

  • keep track of marks but not include those marks in the course grade calculation

  • the gradebook uses marks to calculate a final course grade.

Date: Friday, 10 April, 2-4PM

Venue: Teaching Lab 1, Upper Campus Student Learning Centre, Level 4, Steve Biko Building

PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS WORKSHOP HAS BEEN CANCELLED

 

Wed 8 April 2015 - Test, Quizzes and Assignments

PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS WORKSHOP HAS BEEN CANCELLED

In this workshop, Roger Brown from the Vula team will explore the functionality of the Assignment and Test & Quiz tools. This workshop will be run along the lines of a Q&A workshop with participants proving the topics to be explored or discussed.

Vula's Test and Quiz (T&Q) tool enables you to set MCQs, fill-in-the-blank, numeric response, short answer, true/false or matching type questions. T&Q allows negative marking, generates question statistic and simplifies item analysis. In addition, automatic marking can be used to populate the Vula Gradebook.
 
Vula's Assignment tool is simple to use yet powerful. You can use it to remove the headaches of hardcopy hand-ins and its integration with Turnitin allows you vet the students work for plagarism with minimal additional work for you. The Assignment tool allows you to enter marks online, or upload a spreadsheet, and then populate the Vula Gradebook directly.

 

Wed 01 Apr 2015 - A Basic Introduction to Vula for Teaching and Learning

This workshop will provide UCT staff involved in teaching with a basic introduction to Vula, the learning management system at UCT. This workshop assumes that participants have little or no experience with Vula. We will explore the possibilities of using Vula for various online aspects of a typical course as well as a hands on introduction to some of the basic features in Vula. This will allow participants to start developing and using their own online course sites at UCT. We will also showcase and discuss how selected UCT lecturers have used Vula to enhance their teaching and the learning experience of the students.

This workshop will be led by Ian Schroeder and Sam Lee Pan from the Centre for Innovation in Learning and Teaching (CILT)

 

Mon 9 Mar 2015 - Knowledge Building and Visualisation using Concept Mapping for Teaching and Learning in Higher Education

Concept maps have been shown to be a form of visualisation that has significant value for building, presenting and assessing knowledge. This workshop will attempt to answer the following questions and provide hands on experience where applicable.

  • How are mind maps and concept maps different?
  • How and why can we use concept maps for teaching and learning?
  • How can we develop digital and online concept maps?

This workshop will be presented by Ian Schroeder from the Centre for Innovation in Learning and Teaching (CILT).

 

Mon 2 Mar 2015 - Effective course communications using Vula

PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS WORKSHOP HAS BEEN CANCELLED

Good educators are communicators who make effective use of a repertoire of communication tools for multiple contexts and purposes. Come to this workshop to share your course communication practices and to learn more about how to teach and facilitate using tools within Vula for rich interactive communication within a course community. The featured tools will include discussion forums, blogs, polls, wikis and course e-mail lists.

PLEASE NOTE THAT THIS WORKSHOP HAS BEEN CANCELLED

 

Wed 4 Mar 2015 - Introduction to Vula: Basic Training

The Vula Support Team from the Centre for Innovation in Learning and Teaching (CILT) provides training in the form of 2.5hr hands-on mini-workshops. Training is geared toward providing an introduction to Vula, which includes a comprehensive overview of what Vula can be used for and also addressing immediate training requirements. Groups are limited to a maximum of 18.

Who should attend?
UCT administrative and support staff who require basic skills and knowledge to be able to use Vula for course and/or research administration purposes. 

Outcomes:
At the end of this course you should be able to, among other things:

  • Manage your own Vula account
  • Create and configure a course/project Vula site
  • Manage a course/project Vula site (including adding/removing members and tools)
  • Manage groups and sections (i.e. tutorial  groups) within your Vula site
  • Enable the distribution of content and communication from your Vula site 

Training Date:
Wednesday, 4 March

Venue:
Teaching Lab 1, Upper Campus Student Learning Centre, Level 4, Steve Biko Building

 

Fri 6 feb 2015 - A Basic Introduction to Vula for Teaching and Learning

This workshop will provide UCT staff involved in teaching with a basic introduction to Vula, the learning management system at UCT.  This workshop assumes that participants have little or no experience with Vula.  We will explore the possibilities of using Vula for various online aspects of a typical course as well as a hands on introduction to some of the basic features in Vula.  This will allow participants to start developing and using their own online course sites at UCT. We will also showcase and discuss how selected UCT lecturers have used Vula to enhance their teaching and the learning experience of the students.

This workshop will be led by Ian Schroeder and Sam Lee Pan from the Centre for Innovation in Learning and Teaching (CILT).

 

Mon 2 Feb 2015 - Review your Vula Site for Effective Learning and Teaching

Many lecturers have started using the online space for various aspects of their courses.  One option available for UCT staff who are involved in teaching is the utilisation of Vula for various online activities. This two part workshop will help you to make even more effective use of Vula in your teaching and learning context. It provides an opportunity to review the role of your Vula site in your course and to explore achievable options for redesigning the ways that you use Vula tools in teaching. Each part of the workshop will last 2 hours with a week in between the lab meetings.

Meeting 1:You will analyse your own site using a conceptual framework based on the seven Principles of good teaching. By the end of Part One you will have decided on several available ways to enhance your site.

Meeting 2: We will examine the strengths and weaknesses that emerged and explore ways to introduce new Vula tools or use and/or adapt other exciting technology tools from the Web. Members of CILT will work with you during the workshop on these additions and/ or improvements and will continue to support you as needed after the workshop.

This workshop will be led by Ian Schroeder from the Centre for Innovation in Learning and Teaching (CILT).

Please note: As session 1 and session 2 are repeated it is only necessary to sign up for a single instance of each.

 

Jan 2015 - An introduction to Lessons - a Vula tool for structuring your course (online)

The Lessons tool (formerly called Lesson Builder) allows one to organize resources, quizzes, assignments, forums, and media (e.g. videos, audios and images) in a central location so that students don’t need to navigate to different tools to get things done. Lessons allows you to structure your course in a modular format that could guide your students through their learning tasks. It creates structured pages that pull content and functionality from other tools and organizes them as a series of sequential tasks.  In the current version one can also require that students meet a certain criteria before proceeding to the next section.This workshop will expose the various options in the Lessons tool and provide participants with a hands on experience of using this tool.

This workshop will be led by Lubabalo Badi from the Centre for Innovation in Learning and Teaching (CILT).

 

Fri 30 Jan 2015 - Increasing Participation & Engagement in Lectures: Virtual Classroom Response Systems and Backchannels

Do your students (not just a handful) actively participate in class?

Did your students “get” the section you have just explained?

How easily and quickly do you (as the lecturer) and your students get feedback on their understanding?

Virtual response systems and backchannels can be used during a lecture to improve student participation & engagement but also to provide feedback for both the lecturer and the student. These systems allows a lecturer to rapidly collect and display responses from students in a lecture. This workshop will explore the use of virtual response systems and backchannels as an active learning approach that can be integrated into a lecture as a means of increasing student participation & engagement. In addition, this workshop provides participants with a hands on introduction to virtual clicker systems as well as a backchannel. If you have a web enabled mobile device please feel free to bring it along for the hands on component (please ensure that it is set up for web access!).

This workshop will be led by Ian Schroeder from the Centre for Innovation in Learning and Teaching (CILT).

 

Past Workshops and Seminars 2014

 


Wed 19 Nov

Increasing Participation in Lectures: Classroom Response Systems and Backchannels

Do your students (not just a handful) actively participate in class?

Did your students “get” the section you have just explained?

How easily and quickly do you (as the lecturer) and your students get feedback on their understanding?

Virtual response systems and backchannels can be used during a lecture to improve student participation & engagement but also to provide feedback for both the lecturer and the student. These systems allow a lecturer to rapidly collect and display responses from students in a lecture. This workshop will explore the use of virtual response systems and backchannels as an active learning approach that can be integrated into a lecture as a means of increasing student participation & engagement. In addition, this workshop provides participants with a hands on introduction to virtual clicker systems as well as a backchannel. If you have a web enabled mobile device please feel free to bring it along for the hands on component (please ensure that it is set up for web access!).

This workshop will be led by Ian Schroeder from the Centre for Innovation in Learning and Teaching.

Thurs 13 Nov


Integrating digital literacy into the curriculum

The world out there needs graduates who are 'producers of information and knowledge' rather than 'consumers of information and knowledge'. This means that graduates must be able to find and evaluate information; understand and use digital tools to collaborate, solve problems, and create and effectively share information. Without these 21st century digital literacy competences, graduates struggle to thrive in the knowledge-based economies and technology-driven world. The vast amount of information, for instance on the Internet, and the rapid development of information and communication technology (ICT) that is used for information and knowledge communication, make it compelling for higher education students to be digital literate.

 

In this session, we will share ideas of how academics could integrate digital literacy into the curriculum in order to produce graduates who have ICT, information and learning/academic capabilities. This seminar will be presented by Tabisa Mayisela from the Centre for Innovation in Learning and Teaching.

Thurs 6 Nov


Why ePortfolios in your course for 2015?​

Are you teaching a course where students need to compile evidence of their learning? Perhaps to showcase collections of work to stakeholders outside of the University?

 

ePortfolios allow students to curate different forms of evidence using a variety of media in an online space. What makes ePortfolios unique are their portability and the ability to tell a story about one’s learning journey in a time-stamped way that a paper portfolio is often unable to do. They can also be shared online with an audience beyond the University, such as with potential employers. This seminar will locate ePortfolios within a broader continuum of online evidence of learning, explore these as a tool for a variety of purposes and how these purposes interface with course objectives and assessment.

 

ePortfolios have been used in Higher Education for more than a decade for course assessments and to support the accreditation of professional degrees. More recently, ePortfolios have been used to prepare students for the workplace and allows them to showcase graduate attributes. Notably, the successful use of ePortfolios are most often derived from careful curriculum design and cannot be seen as a ‘tacked on’ technology.

 

By the end of the seminar, you will have a better sense of some of the myths, issues, questions and practical realities surrounding the use of ePortfolios in Higher Education. You will have a clearer idea about whether or not ePortfolios could be a relevant component of your course and the teaching and learning challenges they can and cannot address.

Mon 27 Oct

Teaching with Visuals: Using Visualisations in Higher Education

Using Visualisations in Higher Education

 

This two part workshop will explore how to use images and other visualisations creatively as a lecturer. Copyright issues and options will also be discussed. We will explore the use of Infographics as well as create your own infographics using Wordle and other tools. Lastly we will explore the latest trends and uses of Visuals in Higher Education. This workshop will be co-presented by Rondine Carstens, Thomas King and Ian Schroeder from the Centre for Innovation in Learning and Teaching.

 

Meeting 1: We will discuss the pedagogy of teaching with visualisations. Copyright and Creative Commons relating to visualisations will be explored as well as where to source images online. The nature of effective imagery will also be explored.

Meeting 2: There will be an opportunity to practice what you have learnt, by creating an infographic. You will be shown how to edit photos, add filters, resize images and animate your visuals. Lastly, we will have an overview on “What’s hot and Trending”.

Tue 14 Oct

 

Introduction to Vula: Vula Basic Training

 

Thurs 9 Oct

Bridging the gap: The use of video conferencing to support higher education

The world of video-conferencing is changing rapidly. The move to software endpoints and to virtualised backend infrastructure, as well as the near ubiquity of consumer V-C tools (Skype, FaceTime, etc.) together with development of new more efficient video-conferencing CODECs allows conferencing to move out of the meeting room to everywhere. While there are good examples of the use of conferencing tools in higher education, the fact remains that most conferencing vendors are still focussed on the business user. It is perhaps more difficult to understand the affordances of the various tools available and to make the appropriate choice to support higher education use cases that can include teaching and learning, research collaboration, and more traditional management functions. Some time will be taken to place the various conferencing and collaboration tools in context and to discuss the selection of the appropriate tool for the task in hand.

This seminar will present an overview of some of the recent developments in video-conferencing that may have a relevance to an academic setting, and will showcase some examples of these new approaches in action. In particular, the seminar will highlight the work of networks in physics and mathematics research and teaching which are leveraging the power of these tools to enable programmes and collaborations that would be impossible without them.

Finally the seminar will offer some thoughts for discussion on what it may make sense to offer to the SA HE sector going forward in the way of centrally procured and delivered video-conferencing services.

 

This seminar will be presented by Robert Bristow who is the Senior Co-Design Manager at Jisc (and currently working with Tenet).

Thu 28 Aug

 

Seminar: Learning Design - A step-by-step guide to designing an online course

Most of us have a system for designing an on-campus programme. There are forms to fill out, materials to prepare and schedules to create. Even if you get stuck, there is usually a colleague with sufficient experience of the process who can help and advise. But when you make the decision to offer your course in an online format, where do you start? How do you design an online course that will be pedagogically sound? This presentation will introduce you to the field of learning design, and provide you with an overview of designing an online course for the first time.

This seminar will be presented by Robbert Paddock, the co-CEO of GetSmarter, a specialist online education company.

Fri 29 Aug

 

Mini workshop: An Introduction to Teaching and Learning in the Cloud using Google Apps and Add-ons

Google apps for Chrome and Google Drive allow us to add extra functionality to these environments in a similar way that apps do for smartphones and tablets. The use of these additional functions have the potential to greatly impact on teaching and learning activities in a wide variety of educational contexts. In this workshop we will explore the possibilities for enhancing engagement between lecturers, students and researchers by utlising these additional functionalities that are underpinned by Google Drive’s cloud based features in an educational environment. The hands on component of this workshop will introduce participants to a range of these apps including adding voice comments to Google Documents, managing and using your library of journal articles, collaborative mapping etc. as well as how to manage your apps.

Here, cloud computing refers to storing, editing and sharing files on the internet. These files are accessible via computers, laptops or mobile devices which connect to the internet. Please note that some basic familiarity with the Google Drive cloud service is required for this workshop. This workshop runs on the 22nd of August and repeats on the 29th of August.

This workshop is presented by Ian Schroeder from the Centre for Innovation in Learning and Teaching at UCT.

Tue 02 Sep

 

Mini workshop: Using the Evaluation Tool in Vula

 

This workshop will explore how to use Vula’s Evaluation tools in terms of in class surveys, course evaluations, polls etc. Participants will we taken through the process of setting up their questions, define the poll or evaluation and accessing the results.

Wed 03 Sep

 

Mini workshop: Creating your own Screencast

A screencast is a video recording of the action on your computer screen, often containing audio or/and narration. Screencasts are useful for demonstrating and teaching the use of certain software features. In online education, this technology allows the student and teacher to interact easily over any distance which is why screencasts are useful for recording lectures or tutorials. This workshop will cover the basics of creating your own screencast using online based software (Screencast-O-Matic). Between these two, users can make tutorials on their machines complete with audio, screen and camera recording posting the end result directly onto YouTube and Vimeo.

This workshop will be presented by Tinashe Makwande from the Centre for Innovation in Learning and Teaching

Thu 04 Se

 

Mini workshop: An introduction to Lessons - a new Vula Tool Structuring your course in a modular format (online)

The Lessons tool (formerly called Lesson Builder) allows one to organize resources, quizzes, assignments, forums, and media (e.g. videos, audios and images) in a central location so that students don’t need to navigate to different tools to get things done. Lessons allows you to structure your course in a modular format that could guide your students through their learning tasks. It creates structured pages that pull content and functionality from other tools and organizes them as a series of sequential tasks. In the current version one can also require that students meet a certain criteria before proceeding to the next section.

This workshop will expose the various options in the Lessons tool and provide participants with a hands-on experience of using this tool.

Mon 08 Se

 

Workshop: Using Online Video Conference Tools for Teaching and Research - Synchronous communication for Teaching and Research

With the increase in available bandwidth more and more use is being made of online communications tools. Adobe Connect and Google Hangouts are synchronous communication tool that can be used in a variety of ways and allows you to share audio, video and your computer screen with a large number of remote collaborators. We will explore how these tools are being used at UCT and elsewhere and cover the basics of both Adobe Connect and Google Hangouts and teach you how to get started with using these services. To build your confidience we will arrange virtual meetings to enable you to confidently use these services from your personal computer.

This workshop will be presented by Roger Brown, Cheryl Brown and Ian Schroeder from the Centre for Innovation in Learning and Teaching.

Thu 11 Sep

 

 

Seminar: Virtual Clickers for Engaging Students - A quick lunchtime SlamShop

 

A classroom response system allows a lecturer to rapidly collect and display responses from students in a class session. This session will very briefly outline possibly approaches to using virtual clickers as well a snapshot of current virtual clicker options. Participants will have an opportunity to experience using virtual clickers as well as ask questions and share experiences. If you have a web enabled mobile device please feel free to bring it along. Please ensure that it is set up for web access. This SlamShop will be led by Ian Schroeder from the Centre for Innovation in Learning and Teaching.

Thu 18 Sep

 

 

The Potential of Augmented Reality in Teaching and Learning

TBA

Thu 25 Sep

 

What is happening with ICTs in a high school in the Western Cape? Teaching with Teachnology at Norman Henshilwood High School

What digital skills do first year students have when they arrive at university? How do they use technology for learning? How has technology changed their view and expectations of being taught?  What will characterise the digital divide in the near future?  These are some of the questions tertiary institutions are grappling with in an ever changing environment.

To provide input into some of these questions we have Shandre Otto, the deputy principal of Norman Henshilwood  high school, who will talk us through the school’s  ICT  journey over the last three years. She will also discuss where they currently are with their teaching practice relating to ICT’s in the classroom.

All questions relating to the technical aspects of this ICT project will be handled by Mr van Heerden from the school’s IT Department.

   

Critical issues in the collection, analysis and use of student (digital) data

There are claims that Big Data in higher education will “change everything”, and “revolutionise learning”, that student data are the “new black” and the “new oil”. The harvesting and analysis of student digital data also calls forth a number of metaphors and narratives such as George Orwell’s “1984”, Foucault’s “Panopticon”, Franz Kafka’s “The trial”, Aldous Huxley’s “A brave new world”, a Faustian pact” and “The circle” (see for example Bryant & Raja, 2014; Eggers, 2013; Epling, Timmons & Wharrad, 2003; Hier, 2003; Knox, 2010; Lyon, 2014; Prinsloo, 2013; Puschmann & Burgess, 2014; Richards & King, 2013; and Solove, 2001). As student data are increasingly used to personalise learning and to allocate resources, we may realise we are increasingly creating a “brave new world” with Delta children wearing khaki, Epsilons wearing black (“they’re too stupid to be able to read or write”), and Gammas and Deltas (Huxley, 2007, p. 22); a world where “secrets are lies”, “sharing is caring” and where “privacy is theft” (Eggers, 2013, p. 303).

Much of the discourses regarding Big Data in higher education focus on increasing efficiency and cost-effectiveness, amidst and often despite concerns regarding privacy, surveillance, and the nature of evidence in education (Andrejevic, 2014; Biesta, 2007, 2009; Couldry, 2014; Eynon, 2013; Hargreaves & Braun, 2013; Morozov, 2013; Prinsloo & Slade, 2013; and Wagner & Ice, 2012). In the context of the current dominant discourse of “societies of control” (Deleuze, 1992, p. 4), Big Data and its algorithms resemble a possible “gnoseological turning point” in our understanding of knowledge, information and faculties of learning where bureaucracies increasingly aspire to transform and reduce “ontological entities, individuals, to standardized ones through formal classification” into algorithms and calculable processes (Totaro & Ninno, 2014, p. 29).The current rhetoric resembles a “quantification fetish” (Morozov, 2013b, p. 243) and heralds a paradigm shift or “algorithmic turn” (Napoli, 2013, p. 1) in the ways we understand and study our engagement with students. While the benefits of ethical harvesting and analysis of student data do open up opportunities for more effective and appropriate teaching and learning, much of the current debates on the use of Big Data in higher education resemble a “techno-solutionism” (Morozov, 2013b) or “techno-romanticism” in education (Selwyn, 2014).

In this “age of analytics” (Tene & Polonetsky, 2012, p.1), “algorithmic regulation” (Morozov, 2013a, par.15), the “algorithmic turn” and “the algorithm as institution” (Napoli, 2013, p. 1) we need to consider the regulative, normative, and cultural-cognitive dimensions in the intersection between algorithm and institution where code becomes law (Napoli, 2013, referring to Lessig, 2006). Big Data is, therefore not an unqualified good (Boyd and Crawford, 2011) and “raw data is an oxymoron” (Gitelman, 2013). Technology and specifically the use of data has always been ideological (Henman, 2004; Selwyn & Facer, 2013; Selwyn, 2014) and embedded in relations of power.

In the context of the dominant discourses of “data-driven improvement and accountability” (Hargreaves and Braun, 2013) and “technological somnambulism” (Winner, 2004), we cannot ignore the tensions and paradoxes in the increasing the algorithmic turn in higher education. While concerns regarding student privacy and ethical issues in the harvesting and analysis of student data should be addressed (e.g. Prinsloo & Slade, 2014), we also need to situate the harvesting and use of student data in the discourses surrounding governmentality, information justice (Johnson, 2013), and the distribution of power (Henman, 2004; Selwyn & Facer, 2013; Selwyn, 2014).

Paul Prinsloo is a Research Professor in Open Distance Learning (ODL) in the College of Economic and Management Sciences, University of South Africa (Unisa). His academic background includes fields as diverse as theology, art history, business management, law, education, online learning, and religious studies. Paul has published numerous articles in the fields of teaching and learning, student success in distance education contexts, learning analytics, curriculum development and corporate citizenship. He was awarded international fellowships to the Open University in 2007, 2009, and 2010 and received the Unisa Chancellor’s Award for Outstanding Research in 2008. He received a C3 NRF rating in 2013. Paul embraces social media and actively engages in digital scholarship through Twitter (@14prinsp), Facebook, Linkedin and a blog dedicated to open distance teaching and learning (http://www.opendistanceteachingandlearning.wordpress.com).

   

Networked literacies and agency: an exploration

Amidst the changing higher education landscape (e.g. Blackmore, 2001; Watters, 2012), the current discourse in higher education is flooded with notions of different types of literacies (Ahmadpour, 2014), the notion of metaliteracy(Mackey & Jacobson, 2010, 2014; Witek, & Grettano, 2014), fluencies (Sharkey, 2013), intelligences (Gardner, 2008, 2011; White, 2005), and of course, skills and attributes needed by students (Barnett, 2004, 2009; Coetzee, Botha, Eccles, Holtzhausen & Nienaber, 2012; Kreber, 2014; Prinsloo, 2012, 2013), and staff (Arinto, 2013; Kiffer & Tchibozo 2013). In responding to the tensions and anxieties of, but not limited to, the increasing inequalities of the 21st century (Bauman, 2004, 2011; Piketty, 2014) and the increasing number of claims and counter-claims by a range of stakeholders (Apple, 2010; Barnett, 2004; Martin, 2007), we increasingly reflect on and redefine the purpose of higher education and notions of graduateness . Each new day therefore sees yet another set of literacies, skills, or propositions being introduced, replacing the lists received last month and acclaimed yesterday. Possibly underlying our anxious search for definitions of “literacy” lays an unease that the knowledge maps of the past have, to a large extent, been proven to be fragile (Barnett, 2000) and (possibly/mostly?) the illegitimate offspring of unsavory liaisons between ideology, context and humanity’s gullibility in believing in promises of unconstrained scientific progress (Gray, 2004; 2014). Our continuous search for definitions, frameworks, and taxonomies of literacy has become our hope for creating a center that holds…

There are many possible lenses through which we can engage with literacies. In this seminar I would like to reflect on literacy-as-agency as basis for a critical consciousness through which we are empowered to ‘read the world” (Freire, 1989, p. xvii); a world characterised by the changing nature of knowledge and the production of knowledge (Barnett, 2004, 2009), rising inequalities (Bauman, 1998, 2011; Piketty, 2014; Standing, 2011) and networks (Castells, 2009). Using Bourdieu’s concepts of field, habitus, and capital (Grenfell, 2012) I will propose the notion of performing metaliteracy using the broad tenets of actor-network theory (ANT) (Fenwick & Edwards, 2010, 2014)

Performing metaliteracy involves an embodied and agentic understanding (Archer, 2003; Dawson, 2012; Emirbayer & Mische, 1998; Shilling, 1999) of the cognitive, technological, social, affective and metacognitive dimensions of metaliteracy. I conclude by proposing metaliteracy as agency in the service of hope (Webb, 2013), moving from “a rhetoric of conclusions towards a rhetoric of contentions” (Fountain, 1999, p. 339) in a time “when the old is dying and the new cannot be born” (Gramsci, 1971, p. 110).

Paul Prinsloo is a Research Professor in Open Distance Learning (ODL) in the College of Economic and Management Sciences, University of South Africa (Unisa). His academic background includes fields as diverse as theology, art history, business management, law, education, online learning, and religious studies. Paul has published numerous articles in the fields of teaching and learning, student success in distance education contexts, learning analytics, curriculum development and corporate citizenship. He was awarded international fellowships to the Open University in 2007, 2009, and 2010 and received the Unisa Chancellor’s Award for Outstanding Research in 2008. He received a C3 NRF rating in 2013. Paul embraces social media and actively engages in digital scholarship through Twitter (@14prinsp), Facebook, Linkedin and a blog dedicated to open distance teaching and learning (http://www.opendistanceteachingandlearning.wordpress.com).